Consumer Behavior in each generation.


In each generation of people: Baby Boomers, Generation X, Generation Y, Generation Z they have a lot of different characteristic. They are different in term of demographic, personality, lifestyle, values, attitudes and experiences. These differences affect the decision to purchase products and services. Moreover, in the era of technology, the digital age, everything changes so fast including the way businesses run. It is not a surptise that more businesses turn to run on the Internet. This is one of the reasons that people in each generation have to adjust their behaviors to match with the new paradigm. What about marketers behavior? They must know the consumer behavior for each generation that lead them to get their product’s satisfaction. When the customers feel satisfy on the products and services,they will trust the company and more likely will become the loyal customer.

GENERATION Z or GEN Z

Also known by a number of other names, is the demographic cohort after the Millennials (Generation Y). There is no precise date for when Generation Z begins, but demographers and researchers typically use the mid-1990s to mid-2000s as starting birth years. There is little consensus regarding ending birth years. 
While their pockets are small, their influence is mighty. A generation whose economic output hardly exists has captivated the attention of marketers and brands because of what makes them so unique – they have never known a world without the Internet. And Gen Z’s parents are paying for their desires; 93% of parents say their children influence family spending and household purchases.

WHAT GOES INTO THEIR PURCHASING DECISIONS?
Authenticity, authenticity, authenticity! Brand distrust is fervent among Gen Z. In order to foster loyalty, brands need to be totally transparent and honest to their customers, 77% of Gen Z prefer ads that show real people in real situations and 65% dislike ads that make life look perfect. Also, Gen Z is willing to shell out more for brands that contribute to social or economic causes.
Social media has the largest impact on influencing purchase decisions for Gen Z. With 80% of purchases by this generation influenced by social media, the channels making the biggest impact are: Instagram (44%), Snapchat (21%) and YouTube (32%). The youngest cohort also responds well to social media influencers and user-generated content.
Although they are young, they have a clear grasp on their finances. Millennials’ struggle with student loans and unaffordable housing has served as a warning sign to Gen Z. 57% of Gen Z would rather save money than spend it immediately, and many are starting savings accounts and building credit at a younger and younger age.

HOW ARE THEY PURCHASING?
Mobile, mobile, mobile. Armed with the Internet at their fingertips, Gen Z is accustomed in doing pre-shopping research on their phones. Gen Z uses its plethora of Google resources to compare prices, styles, availability and ratings of products to make the most educated purchase possible. Being savvy with price-checking tools also makes Gen Z more selective when making big expenditures with many often buying products only when they’re on sale or even delaying gratification by waiting for newer products to become available.
A significant jump from their predecessors, the millennials, Gen Z spends twice as much time on their phones than millennials.
Frictionless and seamless online ordering is critical for the short attention spans of the youngest generation, a few seconds delay can be a purchase deal breaker. Nearly half of Gen Z says the most important thing while shopping is to find things quickly. If an app or website is too slow over 60% say they will not use it.
Gen Zers have an extremely low tolerance for poor quality when it comes to online experiences. Paths to purchase should be straightforward, easy to navigate, and seamlessly transition across online and offline worlds.
Generation Z are confident consumers who want to be in control of their shopping experience and have their feedback heard. Brands can appeal to this demographic through allowing interactivity with the brand, and incorporating Gen Zers opinions and concerns when structuring shopping experiences.
While much of their research is digital, Gen Z still enjoys visiting stores as a social excursion in the same way Millennials do. In fact, 84 percent of Gen Zers intentionally structure their shopping trips a social activity and wait to accumulate a solid list of wants and needs before visiting stores with friends.

WHAT THEY LOOK FOR?
Tech within the retail environment is a must to attract this generation. Touch screens, hashtags, and other opportunities for social sharing should be built into the retail experience. Generation Z has named smartphones and Mixed Reality as the coolest things in tech making Augmented Reality an especially engaging tool for these consumers. Food, fashion, beauty, and video games are the top spending categories. 

MILLENNIALS

Also known as Generation Y or Gen Y, are the generational demographic cohort following Generation X and preceding Generation Z. There are no precise dates for when this cohort starts or ends; specialiststypically use the early 1980s as starting birth years and the mid-1990s to early 2000s as ending birth years. Millennials are sometimes referred to as "echo boomers" due to a major surge in birth rates in the 1980s and 1990s, and because millennials are often the children of the baby boomers. Although millennial characteristics vary by region, depending on social and economic conditions, the generation has been generally marked by an increased use and familiarity with communications, media and digital technologies. 
Did you know millennials are now the largest group in the workforce? Spending $600 Billion a year, millennials’ desires and needs are reinventing the commerce landscape?

WHAT GOES INTO THEIR PURCHASING DECISIONS?
Millennials are harnessing the power of the Internet to make better, more informed decisions; 33% of millennials rely on blogs before making a purchase and eight out of 10 millennials never buy anything without reading a review first. And brands put a ton of money into getting their attention, whereas traditional marketing has taken a backseat (less than 1% of Millennials are influenced by traditional ads), and word of mouth marketing, user-generated content, and social selling are much more persuasive.
Like Gen Z, authenticity is incredibly important to this generation and millennials are inherently suspicious of being sold or lied to by brands. Millennials want brands to get real and rally behind a cause, and they are willing to pay for it – in fact, they are 50% more likely to purchase from a company that supports a cause. Like Gen X, Gen Y is also skeptical of overbearing marketing tactics. Millennials tend to reject retailers who constantly push products through messaging and instead prefer authentic interactions with sales associates who happen to also be consumers of their retailer’s products. Millennials are also likely to interact with brands and retailers through social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook in order for their voices to be heard.
Social media has transfixed this generation, and can be a significant tool for brands. A study found that 62% of millennials say that if a brand engages with them on social networks, they are more likely to become a loyal customer. Retailers should recognize that social media is extremely important to Millennials in their purchasing journey because even though they value the opinions of family and friends, they seek out the experiences of other consumers above all. Not only do 90 percent of Millennials research product reviews online, most tend to rely on other consumers’ reviews on retailers’ sites over those of people they know. By taking advantage of all these forms of recommendations, it’s no surprise that 82 percent of Millennials say word-of-mouth is a key influencer of their purchase decisions.
Millennials are very price-conscious and base their purchasing decisions on getting the utmost value out of their purchase. Price is the most significant force powering brand loyalty, and two-thirds of millennials say they will switch brands if they are offered a discount of 30% or more.

HOW ARE THEY PURCHASING?
Millennials are multi device savvy, meaning they regularly switch between using different types of tech devices a day. This is true for commerce. Whether it is online researching, shopping in-store, or purchasing on mobile device or desktop computer – technology enables millennials to purchase how they want and when they want. Unsurprisingly, millennials are more likely to buy on their smartphones than the rest of the population (43% versus 28%). Millennials check their smartphones 150 times/day, relying on this platform for product research and exploration. In fact, 4 out of 5 say that they have discovered new brands, products, or services using their smartphones. 
Growing up in a time when computers were widely available meant that Millennials have become numb to traditional online advertising. Their shopping preferences are instead influenced by peer recommendations and opinions from social media influencers, preferring authenticity from real consumers. In fact, 82% of Millennials say word of mouth greatly influences their purchase decisions.
Research shows that Millennials enjoy shopping and see it as fun and relaxing activity to be shared with friends and family. The grand majority of Millennials report that they shop with other people at least half the time, and 60 percent consider advice from their friends when deciding what to buy.
Of course, the social consumer experience is not only limited to shopping mall excursions but social media as well: 68 percent of Millennials admit to being strongly influenced by social media posts while 84 percent say user-generated content has at least some influence on what they buy.
Shoppers in the millennial demographic seek personalized experiences and streamlined payment options, such as self-checkout kiosks and digital payment technologies, Forbes reported. Because millennial consumers have had access to the internet their entire lives, they consider it second nature to make payments using a variety of devices and frequently use their phones as digital wallets. Retailers such as Starbucks have responded by developing millennial-friendly apps that allow ordering, payments, discounts and rewards to these consumers, according to news from Forbes.

WHAT THEY LOOK FOR?
Millennials are drawn to experiences versus tangible products and expect a high level of customization and customer service. In retail, brands can provide Millennials the excitement they crave with standout retailtainment, Instagram-worthy displays and packaging and exclusive events.

GENERATION X or GEN X 

Gen X is the demographic cohort following the baby boomers and preceding the Millennials. There are no precise dates for when Generation X starts or ends. Demographers and researchers typically use birth years ranging from the early-to-mid 1960s to the early 1980s. Some of the cultural influences on Gen X youth were the musical genres of grunge and hip hop music, and indie films. In midlife, research describes them as active, happy, and achieving a work–life balance. The cohort has been credited with entrepreneurial tendencies. Generation X’s characteristics, lifestyles, and attitudes tend to be self-reliant and innovative which create a specific marketing information. They do not believe in destiny and vow that can help the to be advancement and success in the short time without feeling weary. They generally are individual worker, not teamwork.Moreover, they like creativity that make things more valuable and practical. Moreover, they like stimulant that lead them to challenging environment, flexible in short-term duty, growth opportunity, and future development
Sandwiched between the Boomers and Millennials, Gen X is often referred to the “middle child” generation due to its reputation of often being forgotten by marketing specialists. Because of this, there is little market research into their spending habits compared to those of Boomers and Millennials.
The spending power of Gen X can’t go ignored; Gen Xers make up 25% of the population yet produce 31% of the total US income. These are the decision makers.

WHAT GOES INTO THEIR PURCHASING DECISIONS?
They are also digitally-savvy, 60% of Gen Xers use a smartphone on a daily basis, while 67% use a laptop/PC daily – which surpassed the 58% of Millennials who use laptops/PCs daily. Meaning, the best way to reach Gen X is through laptops and desktops. This doesn’t mean that this generation should be marketed the same as millennials. Gen X prefers honest and clear product and marketing messages that outline an obvious path-to-purchase. Gen X is more likely to conduct online research at home and then shop in person, while their younger counterparts conduct research on their phones, in the store. The best way to reach Gen X? Email. And while most are on social media, they are much more influenced by email marketing campaigns
They are more likely to buy products that are unique and high-quality, as opposed to Generation Y and Z who buy based on community and value. When looking at brand loyalty, customer service is the most important driver of loyalty. Gen X doesn’t care as much about engaging with brands online, but they are incentivized by discounts.

HOW ARE THEY PURCHASING?
With their penchant for pragmatism, Gen Xers are driven by information. Most of their paths to purchase start with an extensive amount of online research, focused on value and product performance. If they already have a product in mind, they will actively seek out consumer reviews, comparison sites, and opinions via social media. They prefer to discover products through email and online search.

WHAT THEY LOOK FOR?
Generation X seeks high quality products at the best value. They are willing to spend money if it’s worth their investment. They have long outgrown the phase of ‘fitting in’ and instead look for ways to stand out through unique products that will help them express their individuality. Luxury products, travel, and food and wine are particularly popular categories for this generation

BABY BOOMERS

Also known as boomers, they are the demographic cohort following the Silent Generation and preceding Generation X. There are varying timelines defining the start and the end of this cohort; demographers and researchers typically use starting birth years ranging from the early to mid-1940s and ending birth years ranging from 1960 to 1964. Baby boomers are associated with a rejection or redefinition of traditional values. Many commentators, however, have disputed the extent of that rejection, noting the widespread continuity of values with older and younger generations. In Europe and North America, boomers are widely associated with privilege, as many grew up in a time of widespread government subsidies in post-war housing and education, and increasing affluence. 
As a group, baby boomers were the wealthiest, most active, and most physically fit generation up to the era in which they arrived, and were amongst the first to grow up genuinely expecting the world to improve with time. They were also the generation that received peak levels of income; they could therefore reap the benefits of abundant food, clothing, retirement programs, and sometimes even "midlife crisis" products. The increased consumerism of this generation has often been criticized as excessive. 
The boomers have tended to think of themselves as a special generation, very different from preceding and following generations. In the 1960s, as the relatively large numbers of young people became teenagers and young adults, they, and those around them, created a very specific rhetoric around their cohort, and the changes they were bringing about. This rhetoric had an important impact in the self-perceptions of the boomers, as well as their tendency to define the world in terms of generations, which was a relatively new phenomenon. 
Significantly, 71% of Baby Boomers use social media platforms on a daily basis, Facebook being the most popular one amongst all generations.
The Boomer generation has the greater amount of disposable income than all the other generations, but it is their purchasing patterns that set them apart the most from the younger generations. According to a study conducted by Visa, by 2020 there will be 11 million more consumers over age 60, while the share of spending among younger consumers is expected to decline over the next 10 years.

WHAT GOES INTO THEIR PURCHASING DECISIONS?
Baby boomer’s characteristics, lifestyles, and attitudes have determined by their careers and retirement life. This generation has knowledge about technology and innovation more than previous generations, but still, they are far behind younger generations. For the marketing information of the Baby Boomer buyers, they want immediate service that accept a little change and prompt improvement. Sometimes, they like alternatives and flexibility. Moreover, they concern about the quality of the product more than the price. The interesting issues for this generation are health, energy, and wellness. These issues are major goals for them especially, health is a major concern for this generation. On the other hand, they do not like bureaucratic system because this system spends more time and do not give value to the person according to their ability.
For them, shopping serves a different purpose than other generations, less than a third of baby boomers find shopping relaxing. And likely the best generation to win at The Price is Right; boomers scored highest in knowing how much products cost – reflecting a more price conscious and fiscally conservative generation.
Just 37% of baby boomers say they are likely to browse for new products, the majority of this generation isn’t interested in trying and testing out new products, and much more likely to buy what they originally intended on buying. This purchase confidence is echoed in how baby boomers see reviews and referrals, only 12% of boomers rely on family and friends to help them decide on a purchase.

HOW ARE THEY PURCHASING?
At 84 %, Boomers were highest amongst all the generations to want to shop in-store and 67% note that if what they are looking for is unavailable, they prefer to purchase it at their local retailer rather than order online.
And while boomers are preferential to the in-store experience, they are not unfamiliar with online shopping. With 85 percent of surveyed Boomers reporting that they research products on their web browsers, brands need to take an omnichannel approach when marketing and selling to boomers.
Younger generations aren’t purchasing like their parents or grandparents, so to move the purchasing needle to implement a tailored business approach for each generation.
When it comes to the joy of shopping, Baby Boomers want convenience above all else.

OTHER GENERATIONS

1) The Silent Generation is the demographic cohort following the cohort known in the United States as the G.I. Generation. There are no precise dates for when The Silent Generation starts or ends. Demographers and researchers typically use mid-to-late 1920s as starting birth years and early-to-mid 1940s as ending birth years for this cohort.

2) The G.I. Generation (also known as the WWII Generation or The Greatest Generation in the United States or the Federation Generation in Australia) is the demographic cohort following the Lost Generation. There are no precise dates for when this cohort starts or ends; demographers and researchers typically use the early 1900s as starting birth years and ending birth years in the mid-1920s.

3) The Lost Generation was the generation that came of age during World War I. Lost in this respect means disoriented, wandering, directionless—a recognition that there was great confusion and aimlessness among the war's survivors in the early post-war years. The term is synonymous with a group of artists, and particularly US-expatriate writers, living in Paris during the 1920s. Gertrude Stein is credited with coining the term; it was subsequently popularized by Ernest Hemingway who used it as an epigraph for his 1926 novel The Sun Also Rises.

CONCLUSIONS

Whether consumers are looking for information, entertainment, or a social outing, physical retail plays a huge role across all generations. Still, brands cannot discount the growing importance online plays in the initial stages of the consumer journey through to product purchase. Shopping experiences must transcend digital boundaries allowing for a smooth transition between the online and offline worlds with a growing emphasis on excitement and personalization.

Sources: Various sources including Forbes, Wikipedia, Think with Google, etc

Winter & Skin

We entered from some time in the cold weather season and I want to share some tricks about “How to take care of our skin in this time of the year” with all of you. I know all of us are aware about most of the things that I write below but in our modern life we intend to lose sight of the most important part in our lives that is "To take care of yourself”.

1. Even in winter, Do Not Forget about Sunscreen.

Winter sun can be just as damaging as summer sun, it’s important to use sunscreen of at least 15 SPF all year round. On bright winter days, snow reflects the sun’s rays — up to 80 percent, according to the Skin Cancer Foundation — increasing your risk of exposure. This means whether you’re out on the slopes, playing in the snow, or just walking through a parking lot on an errand run, it’s just as important to apply sunscreen in the harsh winter weather as it is in the summer. Also, don’t be fooled by darker, dreary days in winter, either. The sun’s harmful UV rays can permeate clouds and still cause damage. Apply to any exposed area natural cosmetics with a safe option like zinc oxide or titanium dioxide.

2. Moisturizing, Moisturizing, Moisturizing!

Your skin not only needs more moisture, but moisture right after you wash. Moisturizing to damp skin helps seal that dampness into the skin. You can use common household oils to moisturize your skin, lips, hair and scalp. I recommend natural cosmetics with ingredients like shea butter, coconut, argan, avocado, jojoba, olive or almond oils. If your skin is dry, rub some coconut oil (or other natural oil mentioned above) onto your wet skin for hydration. You can apply it to your face, hands, feet, scalp, lips and hair.
Make sure you use a natural product like coconut oil or another oil instead of industrial lotions filled with synthetic ingredients!
Be sure to test homemade products on a small patch of skin to check for allergic reactions. Since they’re made from perishable ingredients, they have a shorter shelf life than store-bought products, so discard them within a few months or earlier if you notice changes to their consistency or scent. 

3. Save time and money! Make your own cosmetics with what we have in the kitchen.

Your kitchen rivals the department store counter in abounding with dry skin treatments—cheaper and more healthful ones too. Some of the things that boost your skin's health and appearance from the inside also do so when applied on the outside. A couple of the best are honey and milk-based products including yogurt and cream, cucumbers and lemon juice. You can mix and match these edible ingredients along with others such as cream, avocado and oatmeal to create a personal solution to your skin's needs and leave on skin for 10-30 minutes for lasting hydration.
Honey. If you need a little extra moisturizing punch in areas so dry, they're cracking, rub on a thin layer of honey and let it sink in for a while before you wipe off the gooey extra. It's a little sticky but it's especially great for the ravages of winter—chapped lips and cracked feet. It also get nutrients and antioxidants that feed your skin and make it look ravishingly healthy. And it blends well with fruits and vegetables like avocado to make a face mask.
Yogurt is also an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory that can take the edge off itchiness and loosen the tightness you feel when your skin dries out. As with honey, rub it in, let it soak in and rinse it off.
Avocado. No time or money to go to the spa? Make an avocado face mask in your kitchen. Mash it up and blend it with one of the other products listed here—honey or olive oil or try egg whites. Its oil penetrates the skin deeply, bringing with it the vitamins and antioxidants the fruit contains. Avocado reduces the appearance of aging as well as skin irritations like acne, rashes, eczema and sunburn. 
Oatmeal. Eat it for breakfast because it's good for you and then use it on your face as a scrub to gently remove dead skin. It's one of several products on your kitchen shelf that can act as an exfoliant—sugar, ground nuts and coffee are three more—but it's one of the best because of its hydrating qualities. You'll want to mix those others with some type of oil to soften their harshness.
Cucumbers. You've probably heard this before—and it's true. If you've had too many late nights and too little sleep, and it's starting to show in the dark circles and puffiness around your eyes, place a slice of cucumber on each eye and lay back to let it tighten that slack skin. Its ascorbic acid will draw out the excessive moisture that causes your eyes to look swollen as it nourishes your skin. It can also be used to take some of the sting out of a sunburn. Pricy eye pads from the cosmetics counter? These will do the job just as well.
Lemon juice. Need a skin toner? Don't buy a fancy product with fragrance and possibly even drying alcohol. Just dab on some lemon juice for 10 or 15 minutes and rinse. It will not only tighten your skin but subtly lighten blemishes, scars, freckles and other discolored spots. Its antibacterial and astringent properties can help stave off breakouts.

4. Exfoliating.

We often forget to help the skin slough off dead cells in the winter, particularly on our hands. Yet moisture can’t get in if the dead cells are too plentiful. Find an exfoliating mask and use it on your face and your hands, as well as gently on your lips, then follow immediately with moisture to truly see a smoother difference. Exfoliating body washes are also helpful in the winter months. Don’t over-exfoliate your skin. One time per week should be more than plenty, especially if you normally lightly wash your face with a wash cloth (with very light rubbing of course, not scrubbing).

5. Drink water! 

Boost the effects of any of these natural skin treatments by making sure that your skin gets enough moisture inside and out. This isn't the time to slack off on drinking plenty of water even though you might not feel as thirsty as you do in the summer. A little warm water with lemon can be very refreshing and hydrating at the same time.

6. Warm Showers.

It may be tempting to take a long, steamy shower, but your skin will be much better-served with a 5 to 10 minute lukewarm shower (or bath). Not only will your skin benefit from warm showers, your muscles can benefit from them as well. You should also avoid using excessively hot water when washing your hands — if the water causes your skin to turn red, it’s too hot. Washing your hands in cooler water appears to be as effective at removing germs as warm water and is less irritating to skin. And if you're using a restroom air hand-dryer, use it just until your hands are damp rather than perfectly dry. 

7. Soap.

Soap can cause all sorts of havoc to your skin – especially in the winter. When you are looking to buy some soap at your local store, the first thing you are going to want to check out is the list of ingredients. Any soaps that have perfumes, antibacterial components or deodorants should raise some red flags. Instead – look for soaps that have natural ingredients. A key tip is if you cannot pronounce the list of ingredients, it probably is not worth using on your body.

8. Heating.

Heating systems dry out the air, so consider installing a humidifier in your home or placing pans of water in strategic locations such as heating/air vents and radiators, particularly in your bedroom, to put moisture back into the air and help prevent your skin from drying out.

Give yourself at least one hour per day to take care of your mind, body and spirit. Love yourself and the Universe will love you back.

Let's talk a little about the Sunflower.

I love everything, and in the summer the fields stretched out by the vibrant yellow of the sunflower fill my soul of happiness and beauty.  I often stop to admire it wherever I find it;  country roads, florists, stalls, specialized markets;  and I often cheer up my house with a bunch of sunrise, as it is told by my birth rocks.  enchanted by this wonder of nature, I thought to gather information about the history and use of the sunflower and to share it with you.  We all know it as the flower that returns after the sun but less know that its scientific name Helianthus annuus derives from the Greek words Helios (meaning sun) and Anthos (which translates by flower), respectively.  1. Symbolism In Persian culture it was associated with Mithras, the god of the sun.  In Christianity, it also means God's love, symbolizing prayer and monastic obedience.  In Greek mythology, the emblem of Clytia was rejected by Apollo and transformed into a sunflower.  It is considered a magical flower in China where it represents longevity.  It is often given in the third year of marriage as a sign of adoration, loyalty and power.  In the symbolism of American natives, sunflower is used in late autumn festivals representing harvest and supplies for autumn and winter.  2. The Sunflower is originated in America (in the northern one grows 50 species and in the South one is 17).  The Incas were the first cultivators and admirers of the solar plant.  His petals served to create a purple dye with which they decorated their bodies and clothing.  The flower was also used to obtain ointment remedies that were believed to heal even the snake bites.  Because the ancient societies exploited completely any resource, the stem of the flower was often used as a building material.  In Europe, it was first grown in 1510 in the royal garden of Madrid from seeds from Mexico.  In 1576, Belgian botanist Lobelius baptized him with the scientific name he still carries today.  It is now a common sight in the world, being cultivated in France, Spain, Italy, USA, Russia, Argentina, India and Eastern Europe.  Sunflower is a symbol of culture, being the emblem of the state of Kansas (state located in the West of the United States).  In our country, it was introduced at the beginning of the last century.  Her first attestation;  is the painting of Iasi's painter Ludovic Stavski, "Iaşul in 1842", which includes it in a landscape.  3. Art Numerous artists have surprised the beauty of this flower in their works and Vincent Van Gogh's name has always been associated with that of the sunflower;  the artist wrote to Theo (his brother): "the sunflower belongs in some way to me."  The flower had a special significance for him: the yellow symbolized friendship and hope, while the flower itself expressed gratitude.  4. Cosmetics The soothing properties of sunflower oil keep the skin hydrated, making it ideal for people who have dry or sensitive skin.  It is quickly absorbed by the skin without blocking the pores and can be used directly on the skin or combined with other oils.  Sunflower oil is an important source of vitamin E.  This anti-aging antioxidant fights the damage caused by free radicals, stimulating cellular regeneration.  Antioxidants, vitamins and fatty acids have the ability to slow down the aging process of the skin, preventing fine lines and premature wrinkles. It can also be used in body massaging with extraordinary effect on people with a slightly drier, cold-sensitive skin.  In the case of soft or peeling nails, sunflower oil can be a solution.  Daily, for 10-15 minutes, the nails should be kept in warm, oil-rich, oil at a curable temperature.  The cure will take at least a week.  5. Remedies In particular, the flowers of the cultivated plants, namely the seeds, the leaves and the root are rarely used.  The plant is rich in active substances, organic acids,  and the seeds have complete protein.  The effect is curative, the flowers have diuretic, astringent, antipyretic, antineural properties.  Flowers and leaves are dry and can be stored in cloth bags for 2 years.  The leaves have flavonoid substances, saponins, glycosides, carotenoids, resin, choline, organic acids.  The flowers contain glycosides, flavones, choline, betaine, alcohols, organic acids and others.  The seeds are rich in fatty oil, carbohydrates, proteins, carotenoids, tannins, lecithin, citric acid, vitamin A and E. A fresh tincture of sunflower is prepared to help treat fever.  Flowering infusion is also used for therapeutic purposes.  It is made from flowers but also from the upper airpaths of the plant that are tender.  Infusion is effective in the treatment of lung, cold, and even malaria.  It also has expectorant, astringent and diuretic properties, helps to increase appetite, soothes heart aches, neuralgia and stomach pains, is effective in cases of rheumatism, bronchitis, nerve diseases and gastrointestinal colic.  The decoction of the plant flowers is recommended in cases of jaundice, bronchitis, intestinal colic, heart disease, malaria, upper respiratory tract disorders.  Sunflower seeds are industrially processed to obtain food oil.  In popular medicine sunflower oil is appreciated for its emollient, analgesic and laxative properties.  It has a significant content of vitamin A and E, unsaturated fatty acids, carotenoids, copper, magnesium and lecithin.  Helps in the treatment of joint pain and has an effect on the healing of fresh wounds and light burns.  It is used in the form of oily dressings or ointments.  The sunflower root is used to make important medicines in popular medicine.  They are useful in the treatment of arthritis, gout, osteochondrosis, for the removal of kidney stones and gallstones.  The root is harvested in autumn, cleansed, washed in water, cut into small pieces and dried.  The dried product is chopped as best as possible to obtain small root bobs.  The most used preparation is the decoction of sunflower root.  Sunflower stems are extracted from fibers used in papermaking.  I finally leave a fragment of the poetry put on Domestic Baptism paper "Oh my heart's heartbreak!  To the future, I totally justify them, Always, like sunflower, to the sun.  "Titled Sunflower Source: on sites gathered

I love everything, and in the summer the fields stretched out by the vibrant yellow of the sunflower fill my soul of happiness and beauty. I often stop to admire it wherever I find it; country roads, florists, stalls, specialized markets; and I often cheer up my house with a bunch of sunrise, as it is told by my birth rocks. enchanted by this wonder of nature, I thought to gather information about the history and use of the sunflower and to share it with you.
We all know it as the flower that returns after the sun but less know that its scientific name Helianthus annuus derives from the Greek words Helios (meaning sun) and Anthos (which translates by flower), respectively. 

1. Symbolism
In Persian culture it was associated with Mithras, the god of the sun. In Christianity, it also means God's love, symbolizing prayer and monastic obedience. In Greek mythology, the emblem of Clytia was rejected by Apollo and transformed into a sunflower. It is considered a magical flower in China where it represents longevity. It is often given in the third year of marriage as a sign of adoration, loyalty and power. In the symbolism of American natives, sunflower is used in late autumn festivals representing harvest and supplies for autumn and winter.

2. History
The Sunflower is originated in America (in the North one grows 50 species and in the South one is 17). The Incas were the first cultivators and admirers of the solar plant. His petals served to create a purple dye with which they decorated their bodies and clothing. The flower was also used to obtain ointment remedies that were believed to heal even the snake bites. Because the ancient societies exploited completely any resource, the stem of the flower was often used as a building material.
In Europe, it was first grown in 1510 in the royal garden of Madrid from seeds from Mexico. In 1576, Belgian botanist Lobelius baptized him with the scientific name he still carries today. It is now a common sight in the world, being cultivated in France, Spain, Italy, USA, Russia, Argentina, India and Eastern Europe. Sunflower is a symbol of culture, being the emblem of the state of Kansas (state located in the West of the United States).
In our country, it was introduced at the beginning of the last century. Her first attestation; is the painting of Iasi's painter Ludovic Stavski, "Iaşul in 1842", which includes it in a landscape.

3. Art
Many artists have surprised the beauty of this flower in their works and Vincent Van Gogh's name has always been associated with that of the sunflower; the artist wrote to Theo (his brother): "the sunflower belongs in some way to me." The flower had a special significance for him: the yellow symbolized friendship and hope, while the flower itself expressed gratitude.

4. Cosmetics
The soothing properties of sunflower oil maintain moisturized skin, making it ideal for people who have dry or sensitive skin. It is quickly absorbed by the skin without blocking the pores and can be used directly on the skin or combined with other oils.
Sunflower oil is an important source of vitamin E. This anti-aging antioxidant is fighting against free radical damage by stimulating cellular regeneration. Antioxidants, vitamins and fatty acids have the ability to slow down the aging process of the skin, preventing fine lines and premature wrinkles. It can also be used in body massaging with extraordinary effect on people with a slightly drier, cold-sensitive skin.
In the case of soft or peeling nails, sunflower oil can be a solution. Daily, for 10-15 minutes, the nails should be kept in warm, oil-rich, oil at a curable temperature. The cure will take at least a week.

5. Remedies
For the therapeutic use, especially the flowers from the cultivated plants, namely the seeds, the leaves and the root are rarely used. The plant is rich in active substances, organic acids, and the seeds have complete protein. The effect is curative, the flowers have diuretic, astringent, antipyretic, antineural properties. Flowers and leaves are dry and can be stored in cloth bags for 2 years. The leaves have flavonoid substances, saponins, glycosides, carotenoids, resin, choline, organic acids. The flowers contain glycosides, flavones, choline, betaine, alcohols, organic acids and others. The seeds are rich in fatty oil, carbohydrates, proteins, carotenoids, tannins, lecithin, citric acid, vitamin A and E.
Fresh sunflower flowers prepare a tincture that helps in the treatment of fever. Flowering infusion is also used for therapeutic purposes. It is made from flowers but also from the upper airpaths of the plant that are tender. Infusion is effective in the treatment of lung, cold, and even malaria. It also has expectorant, astringent and diuretic properties, helps to increase appetite, calms heart aches, neuralgia and stomach ache, is effective in cases of rheumatism, bronchitis, nerve diseases and gastrointestinal colic.
The decoction of the plant flowers is recommended in cases of jaundice, bronchitis, intestinal colic, heart disease, malaria, upper respiratory tract disorders.
Sunflower seeds are industrially processed to obtain food oil. In popular medicine sunflower oil is appreciated for its emollient, analgesic and laxative properties. It has a significant content of vitamin A and E, unsaturated fatty acids, carotenoids, copper, magnesium and lecithin. Helps in the treatment of joint pain and has an effect on the healing of fresh wounds and light burns. It is used in the form of oily dressings or ointments.
The sunflower root is used to make important medicines in popular medicine. They are useful in the treatment of arthritis, gout, osteochondrosis, for the removal of kidney stones and gallstones. The root is harvested in autumn, cleansed, washed in water, cut into small pieces and dried. The dried product is chopped as best as possible to obtain small root bobs. The most used preparation is the decoction of sunflower root. 
Sunflower stems are extracted from fibers used in papermaking.

I finally leave a fragment of the poetry on Domestic Baptism

"My heart is stiffer in my chest!
For the sake of the whole soul, 
Always, like sunflower, into the sun. "
called Sunflower

Source: on sites gathered


Interview Bio Alice by Diana Aunt.